Category Archives: Advanced VLookup Information

Mike and Bill Debate: “=LOOKUP vs. @LOOKUP”

Going back to “VLOOKUP WEEK 2012” Mike ‘ExcelisFun’ Girvin and Bill ‘MrExcel’ Jelen look at the ‘LOOKUP’ Function. Taking cues from an email Bill received from Dan Bricklin [co-founder/inventor of VisiCalc] Bill argues the point that “=LOOKUP” is ambiguous in Microsoft Excel when the Data Set Table is ‘square’. Mike, on the other hand, thinks that “=LOOKUP” is not an ambiguous Function in that scenario; that it is intuitive and dynamic. Follow along with Episode #1550 to hear the debate and decide for yourself.

 

Dueling Excel Podcast #106…This episode is the video podcast companion to the book, “Slaying Excel Dragons: A Beginners Guide to Conquering Excel’s Frustrations and Making Excel Fun“, by Mike Girvin and Bill Jelen. [Currently available in eBook / Print Edition and as a DVD Bundle]

and

“Learn Excel 2007 through Excel 2010 from MrExcel”. Download a new two minute video every workday to learn one of the 512 Excel Mysteries Solved! and 35% More Tips than the previous edition of Bill’s book!

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Tom Urtis at Atlas Programming Management Inc: “LOOKUP Page”

From Tom Urtis of Atlas Programming Management, Inc. we have a full page of Lookup Tutorials including VLOOKUP, HLOOKUP, Reverse LOOKUP, Min/Max LOOKUP and more. Thank you to Tom for creating this resource and allowing VLOOKUP WEEK 2012 to share it here – with all of you!

To view Tom’s Tutorials, Click Here to go to Tom Urtis’ LOOKUP Resource page


Crystal Long Declares: “Not Over Yet… Convert VLOOKUP Equations to MS Access!”

Microsoft Access MVP Crystal Long has Decalred that “VLOOKUP WEEK 2012” is not over yet and has decided to take VLOOKUP in another direction; today Crystal gives us a lesson in Converting VLOOKUP to Equations for MS Access!

“In my last VLOOKUP Week video, I showed you how to make a Distance Table using the VLOOKUP function in Excel. Now, we build the same thing in Access — will show you how to convert VLOOKUP equations to Access.” … To Read More Click Here to go to Crystal Long’s Lesson.

Crystal Long may be found at Strive4Peace as well as on YouTube Learn Access by Crystal


Crystal Long: “VLookup to Calculate Distances using Latitude & Longitude”

From Microsoft Access MVP Crystal Long

“My VLookup video calculates distance between coordinates using VLookup to get Latitude and Longitude from a table of Zip Codes, which is available as a free download on my website. There is also Concatenation, Errors (of course) and how to fix them, Relative and Absolute References, Range Names, Transposing, VBA, Table Styles, Formatting, and Conditional Formatting.”  … To Read More Click Here to go to Crystal Long’s Lesson.

 

Crystal Long may be found at Strive4Peace as well as on YouTube Learn Access by Crystal


From XL-Dennis: “Using VLOOKUP in VB”

From XL-Dennis we have an entry that uses a VLOOKUP in Visual Basic [VB]!

“I thought it would be interesting to create a case and see how VLOOKUP can be part of  VB-solutions. Actually, for several years ago I did similar solutions but with classic VB (VB6) for a customer. Imagine that we have a price list for our products. Because of the frequent price updates the company has decided to store it in a MS Excel workbook.” … To Read More Click Here to go to XL-Dennis’ Lesson.

Among other places around the Cyber-Globe, XL-Dennis may be found at The VSTO & .NET & Excel Blog


Tom Urtis: Lookup with 2 or more criteria

Today’s post from Tom Urtis involves finding the record that matches two criteria, such as Chevrolet in column A and 4-Door in column B. The solution involves INDEX, MATCH entered as an array formula, so this is ranked pretty high on the Excel spicy scale. Read the complete article here.


Rahim Zulfiqar Ali: “Getting Started with New Ideas on LOOKUP”

From Rahim’s Post:
 
The Excel lookup function (LOOKUP, VLOOKUP and HLOOKUP) are not case sensitive. For example, if you write a lookup function to look up the text rahim, the function considers any of the following a match: RAHIM, Rahim or RaHiM
Example:
1. Create the sheet given below:
 
The figure below shows a simple example. Range D2:D7 is named Range1, and range E2:E7 is named Range2. The word to be looked up appears in cell B1 (named Value).  … To Read More Click Here to go to Rahim Zulfiqar Ali’s Lesson.

 

 

 

 

You may find Rahim Zulfiqar Ali Google Sites